Ken Tucker's TV Prime-Time TV commentary

Tag: Sitcoms (21-30 of 200)

Emmy nominations tomorrow: Do ABC, CBS, NBC, and Fox have a chance against AMC, HBO, and Showtime?

When the Emmy nominations are announced tomorrow, you can be sure of two things: The noms will be dominated by cable fare, and the howls you’ll hear from fans will be for non-cable network shows that got passed over.

So, if you’re a fan of Mad Men, Game of Thrones, Homeland, and Breaking Bad, you can be sure that your faves will be more than well-represented. But what are some of your favorite network series? Fringe? Community? Person of Interest? Ah, I would bet that you’ll be out of luck. (Not that I don’t hope I’m wrong about that.) This will also hold true in the TV-movie and miniseries categories. READ FULL STORY

An Andy Griffith tribute: The gentle sheriff of Mayberry was a shrewd, brilliant performer

Andy Griffith was one of the greatest performers in television history. His portrayal of Mayberry, North Carolina, sheriff Andy Taylor is one of the most sustained feats of comic subtlety and grace in any medium. Griffith did a lot before and after The Andy Griffith Show, but that series will remain the cornerstone of his achievement. READ FULL STORY

'Anger Management' premiere review: Charlie Sheen takes a conservative, contradictory route back to sitcom stardom

For a guy who prides himself in interviews on his wildness and his lust for new experiences, Charlie Sheen adheres to a conservative business model when it’s time to make money: the laugh-tracked, multi-camera sitcom, for Two and a Half Men and now Anger Management, which premiered on FX Thursday night. Based loosely on the 2003 Adam Sandler film of the same name, the FX version of Anger stars Sheen as Charlie Goodson, an ex-baseball player turned anger-management therapist. The idea is that Charlie’s had anger issues himself, and this makes him a good, or at least qualified, counselor.  READ FULL STORY

'The Newsroom' premiere review: Did Aaron Sorkin's new HBO series make you mad as hell, or happy as a clam?

The Newsroom, Aaron Sorkin’s return to television, premiered on Sunday night, and let’s get ready to rumble. It’s a series that will serve as an escape-valve of relief, anger, and confirmation, articulating so many things that so many people feel about the frequently-pathetic state of the news media. (In a sense, it wants to be this TV generation’s equivalent to the 1976 movie Network, with the Paddy Chayevsky-written line, “I’m mad as hell and I’m not going to take this anymore!”) It’s also a series that is going to drive some people crazy. For some, it will be because the show is frequently hectoring and repetitive, and it has storytelling problems with its office romances. But for others, it’s going to make them crazy because no matter how clearly Sorkin states the opposite (on-screen and in interviews), The Newsroom is going to strike them as one long liberal — or as Bill O’Reilly will doubtless label it, “far left” — screed. READ FULL STORY

'Girls' season finale: 'I'm very moved'

The arc of the first season of Girls was an undulating one. The Lena Dunham comedy-drama-mixology-experiment commenced, in its first two episodes, as an indie film in half-hour chunks, then ventured further into sitcom territory without dropping its thoughtfulness, and in its finale managed to balance the funny, the serious, the absurd, and the poignant in a strikingly surprising, effective conclusion. READ FULL STORY

'Girls' and 'Mad Men' season finales: A VIDEO review

Girls wraps up its first season on Sunday. In contrast to Mad Men, which concluded with rather muted notes (Don casting a lizard gaze on a woman who chats him up in a bar; Pete looking into his soul and seeing a bag of wet sand), Girls is a-poppin’. READ FULL STORY

Introducing 2012 Emmy Watch: Nominations I wish we'd see

The Emmy nominations are being decided even as I write this. Members of the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences must hand in their ballots by June 28; the nominations will be announced on July 19. Why don’t we help out these folks and suggest worthy candidates?

That’s the thinking behind the long, carefully reasoned, highly passionate, sometimes stubbornly flukey list that follows. As EW’s TV critic, I tend to have some opinions not shared by the majority of official Emmy voters. I also suspect, however, that you, the EW.com reader, share some of my passions — such as Fringe, Girls,  and Community — that the Academy is unlikely to nominate. Which is one reason to agitate for them, right? READ FULL STORY

'Girls' review: 10 reasons to love these partyholics not-so-anonymous

Girls, how much do I love you? Let me count the ways.

1. Most of the characters dance even worse than I do. This is thoroughly endearing, especially when Hannah gyrates as though she might know more moves, but is too enthused to both to try and remember them.

2. The series suggested last night that Brooklyn parties are almost always difficult to find; some things never change. READ FULL STORY

The 2011-12 TV season in review: What went wrong, what was done right, and what should have been

With the last gaspings of season and series finales this week, the 2011-12 season comes to a close. And any season that gave us Homeland, Girls, a great batch of Breaking Bad, Enlightened, and what’s shaping up as a terrific run of Mad Men must be deemed a success, right? Or is the quality outweighed by the soggy awfulness of Free Agents, Two Broke Girls, The Playboy Club, and H8r (oh, let’s face it, everything on the CW except Supernatural and the attempt to bring back Sarah Michelle Gellar, who — much as I like Emily VanCamp — would have been the perfect star for Revenge, not Ringer)? READ FULL STORY

'Mad Men,' 'Sherlock,' 'Girls,' 'The Killing': Sunday-night mini-reviews, from A to B-minus

So much TV on Sunday night; inaugurating a new occasional feature: A round-up of mini-reviews. (All rights reserved to expand upon these thoughts later in the week.)

Mad Men: “I got a million of ‘em,” said Michael Ginsberg, quoting Jimmy Durante and referring to ideas he has for ad campaigns. He’ll need ‘em, since this week’s theme was “every man for himself.” I know — when isn’t that a Mad Men theme? This night READ FULL STORY

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