Ken Tucker's TV Prime-Time TV commentary

Tag: Pundits Right and Left (31-40 of 88)

'When Mitt Romney Came to Town' review: TV news reacts, while Gingrich enjoys 'the suffering'

When Mitt Romney Came to Town, a half-hour video financed by Newt Gingrich’s super PAC Winning Our Future, is a pulverizing piece of propaganda designed to portray Romney as a rapacious, conscience-less businessman who’ll do “anything for a profit,” as one of the quotes from Romney himself phrases it. Heavy on accusation and poignant interviews with unemployed people, the anti-Romney film could have been made by an Occupy Wall Street film student, or by Keith Olbermann during all the time he’s had declining to appear on Current TV. But the fact that it comes from an opponent in Romney’s own party, and lays out a line of attack the Democrats can use in the November election, raises it to high curiosity status. READ FULL STORY

New Hampshire primary TV coverage: Mitt Romney wins in votes and loses in the court of 'I like to fire people'

As the results of the New Hampshire primary vote rolled in, cable news networks had found the theme of the night. It was, roughly speaking, “What the hell was Mitt Romney thinking when he said, ‘I like to fire people’?” By 8 p.m. EST, Romney was the projected winner, with Ron Paul besting Jon Huntsman for second place. That left the pundits with lots of time to ponder the Romney psyche. READ FULL STORY

The Iowa caucuses: Where Santortum surged, and Rachel Maddow and Sarah Palin found (a little) common ground

For most of the prime time hours Tuesday night, the Iowa caucuses were an endlessly varied repetitions of “it’s too close to call” and “it’s a three-way race between Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum, and Ron Paul.” And that’s the way it went until Romney very narrowly defeated Santorum very late into the night. Nevertheless, the TV coverage yielded some interesting moments of contrast-and-compare, of stylistic tics, twists, and turns. READ FULL STORY

The latest Republican debate: Perry falters again, Cain thunders defensively, Bachmann gets 'two Happy Meals,' Newt goes 'radical'

The Republican debate televised on CNBC on Wednesday night featured eight candidates engaged in an economics-themed tussle that will probably be overshadowed in the media by a Rick Perry gaffe and Herman Cain on the sexual-harassment defense. It took a mere 20 minutes for one of the questioners, Maria Bartiromo, to ask Cain about his extra-economic troubles. There were boos from the Michigan audience when she did, and cheers when the questioning was steered back to the issues. READ FULL STORY

'The Five': The Fox News Channel's most delightfully crazy show

Imagine my surprise last Friday when I turned on my favorite guilty pleasure — Fox News’ The Five, its five-person, 5 p.m. five-days-a-week replacement for the full-fathom-five insanity of Glenn Beck — and saw little ol’ me getting slammed by the panel. There on screen was the cover of the new Muppetastic Entertainment Weekly alongside a pic of my ugly mug, as one of the Five, Greg Gutfeld, criticized me for my review suggesting that last week’s South Park was slightly weaker than some of its recent, sterling efforts. READ FULL STORY

David Letterman 'loves' the Occupy Wall Street protests: 'I'm very sympathetic' -- with Leno UPDATE

David Letterman did not pussyfoot around in making clear his feelings about the Occupy Wall Street protestors. “I love these people causin’ trouble,” he said on Monday night’s Late Show. “Increasingly, this is the way we get change in this country.” READ FULL STORY

President Obama, the American Jobs Act, and the media: Who was listening? Who was buying it?

President Obama preempted … Jeopardy!? Seinfeld syndicated reruns? … to deliver his “American Jobs Act” speech, careful to avoid both Big Brother and the Packers-versus-Saints game. The president offered a combination of oratory and policy proposals that were driven home by one oft-repeated phrase: “You should pass this jobs plan right away.” READ FULL STORY

Al Sharpton's new MSNBC show 'PoliticsNation' isn't worth watching. Yet.

The Rev. Al Sharpton premiered PoliticsNation on MSNBC Monday evening with an hour of booming bombast and near-obliviousness, as he steam-rolled over his guests, interrupting them to ask long, halting questions. At one point he acted as though he was having an argument with his teleprompter and said with exasperation to a guest, “Well, let me just ask you my way: Is the Tea Party going to destroy the Republican Party?” Please, Al, can’t every question be asked your way? READ FULL STORY

Jon Stewart to Chris Wallace on 'Fox News Sunday': 'You're insane'

Jon Stewart, making what was billed as “his first appearance ever on a Sunday talk show,” told Chris Wallace, host of Fox News Sunday, he was “insane” if Wallace thinks his comedy has “an ideological, partisan agenda.” His Daily Show satire, Stewart said, “is about absurdity and corruption.” READ FULL STORY

Sarah Palin wins by behaving like a pop star, not a politician: Could a cross between Angelina Jolie and Lady Gaga get nominated? Sure.

From Memorial Day weekend through today and beyond, Sarah Palin is dominating the TV news cycle. She’s doing it by providing garishly irresistible visuals — footage of her big bus, its sides decorated with images of the Constitution, the phrase “One Nation,” and a plug for her website sarahpac.com — and by providing no interviews with the “lamestream media”… except for Fox News. READ FULL STORY

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