Ken Tucker's TV Prime-Time TV commentary

Tag: Cartoons (1-10 of 46)

What TV do you watch on Sunday nights, and when do you watch it?: VIDEO

Sunday nights are getting more crowded with good, essential stuff every week: It’s time to start picking and choosing what you’ll watch in real time, what you’ll DVR for later viewing, and what you might just give up on because it’s just too much TV.

Mad Men. Game of Thrones. The Good Wife. The Killing. READ FULL STORY

'DC Nation' premiere cartoon review: 'Young Justice,' a 'Green Lantern' better than the movie, plus more animation

This week’s launch of DC Nation, a Saturday morning cartoon block, is a most welcome addition to kiddie programming that older people can enjoy, too. The main attractions are a Green Lantern series plus continuation of the excellent first season of Young Justice. READ FULL STORY

One Million Moms hate 'Archie' comics and gay marriage

The conservative organization One Million Moms wants Toys R Us to stop stocking an Archie comic book that features a gay wedding. In the story, the character Kevin Keller gets hitched to Clay, whom he met in a military hospital after being wounded in the armed services. The marriage occurs in Life With Archie #16, featuring a cover depicting the nuptials, and featuring a banner saying, “Just Married.” READ FULL STORY

Completing 2011's TV Top 20: Ken Tucker's Nos. 11-20 shows, including 'Community,' 'Parenthood,' 'Game of Thrones'...

Here, as I do every year, I follow up my TV Top 10 with my picks for numbers 11 through 20. Some of you have said these are consolation prizes, but that’s not so. There’s so much good television, that for a few years, I was stuffing my Top 10 with entries that allowed for multiple shows (“Best Thursday-night sitcoms,” for instance, to let me to sneak three shows into one number) until that started to become unwieldy and ridiculous. (Besides, as a part-time music critic, I like the “Top 20” phrase, with its roots in old pop-music radio.) I had no problem this year coming up with a clean-cut Top 10; what follows are shows that grazed the list, missed it for reasons I’ll occasionally articulate below, and yet are nonetheless full of value.

11. Community So full of pop-culture allusions, it’s the one sitcom steeped in irony that isn’t smug about its own smarts. The series tried to dig a bit deeper emotionally this season, to warm some of the characters and perhaps increase its audience-outreach without betraying itself. Me, I could do with less Chang, more Britta, and a Jeff who doesn’t sometimes seem a charmingly quizzical bystander.

12. Parenthood This was the season that’s come the closest to juggling its big cast most deftly, providing nearly every character with a strong plotline. If it’s inevitable that Lauren Graham’s Sarah and Dax Shepard’s Crosby – the show’s most bumptious personalities – dominated the latter half of the season, I was glad to see strong showcases for Peter Krause, Monica Potter, and Bonnie Bedelia.

13. Prohibition Ken Burns and booze proved to be a smooth yet exciting combination. The year’s best TV documentary extended beyond the history of Prohibition to chronicle the era of women’s sufferage and the rise of gangsterism as well.

14. Modern Family The nation’s most popular sitcom had some growing pains this season: In an admirable attempt to try to widen and deepen its characters, it bumped into some sentimental moments that didn’t quite work emotionally. But that’s just a sign that MF is not becoming complacent, and its ensemble cast is a match for that of any drama on TV. READ FULL STORY

Larry King: 'I want to be frozen when I die.' Seth MacFarlane: 'You want to live forever?'

Oh, my, what a shocker that Larry King: Dinner with King special was on Sunday night. King hosted a dinner at his house with his wife Shawn and a camera crew, with guests Conan O’Brien, Seth MacFarlane, Tyra Banks, Shaquille O’Neal, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, Quincy Jones and Russell Brand. READ FULL STORY

'Batman: The Brave and the Bold' series finale tonight: What a fan-boy Bat-hoot!

Batman: The Brave and the Bold wraps up its run on Friday evening with a terrific send-off, a comic-book fan’s delight: a wittily self-conscious half-hour that finds Bat-Mite trying to get The Brave and the Bold cancelled by turning it into an awful show, to make way for what he really wants — “a darker Batman series!” The fact that that sentiment comes from the voice of Paul Reubens as Bat-Mite only makes it more satirical. READ FULL STORY

Tonight's 'Green Lantern: The Animated Series' premiere: Better than that Ryan Reynolds movie?

The Cartoon Network’s Green Lantern: The Animated Series premieres Friday evening with an hour-long special that’s a lot of fun for both dedicated GL fans and newcomers, thanks to the clever animation and storytelling of executive producers including Bruce Timm and Sam Register (Batman: The Brave and the Bold). READ FULL STORY

'The Five': The Fox News Channel's most delightfully crazy show

Imagine my surprise last Friday when I turned on my favorite guilty pleasure — Fox News’ The Five, its five-person, 5 p.m. five-days-a-week replacement for the full-fathom-five insanity of Glenn Beck — and saw little ol’ me getting slammed by the panel. There on screen was the cover of the new Muppetastic Entertainment Weekly alongside a pic of my ugly mug, as one of the Five, Greg Gutfeld, criticized me for my review suggesting that last week’s South Park was slightly weaker than some of its recent, sterling efforts. READ FULL STORY

'South Park' review: Cartman was the '1%'

South Park deployed Cartman as a symbol of the “1%” that the Occupy Wall Street movement is protesting in an episode that wasn’t all that funny because it was so uncharacteristically obvious. No, wait — South Park is frequently at its best when it is most ferociously obvious; this was merely obvious obvious. READ FULL STORY

'Allen Gregory,' 'The Simpsons' Treehouse of Horror, 'Family Guy,' and 'The Cleveland Show': Which animation dominated your attention?

With its sleek animation and meticulously well-spoken central kid character, Allen Gregory was a quirky addition to Fox’s “Animation Domination” programming bloc on Sunday night. This new creation headed up by actor-producer Jonah Hill, who voices what other characters consider a “pretentious” little seven year-old, was eccentric in a way that belied its glossy surface. Gregory joined a line-up that included the 22nd “Treehouse of Horror” edition of The Simpsons, plus new episodes of Family Guy and The Cleveland Show. READ FULL STORY

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